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| | LA WEEKLY // May 11 - 17, 2018 // www.laweekly.com
Your WeeklY Movie To-Do lisT
A Bergman Bonanza
Friday, May 11
The Academy Film Archive is screening two rarely shown Cuban films from the 1970s in a double feature co-presented by the Cinemateca de Cuba and hosted by its director, Luciano Castillo. Based on a 1959 novel by Ortiz Fernández, A Cuban Fight Against the Demons — newly restored by the Academy — dramatizes the plight of Cuban revolutionaries against Spanish colonizers in the 17th century. The Survivors is a satirical look at a wealthy family’s retreat from reality in the wake of the Cuban revolution. The director of both films, Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, is best known for his 1968 masterpiece Memories of Underdevelopment; here is a chance to connect with two of his lesser-known works. A special panel will feature Alea’s widow, actress Mirta Ibarra, and cinematographer Mario García Joya. Linwood Dunn Theater, 1313 Vine St., Hollywood; Fri., May 11, 7 p.m.; $5. (310) 247-3000, www.oscars.org.
Saturday, May 12
The summer of Bergman continues with a citywide cel- ebration marking the Swedish director’s centennial. The American Cinematheque has a doozy of a triple feature: Through a Glass Darkly, Winter Light and The Silence. Often referred to as the “Faith Trilogy” or simply “the Trilogy,” all three films hinge on the kind of existential anguish that made Bergman a household name among the art-house crowd in the early 1960s. The Egyptian will present each feature in crisp DCPs for a night not soon to be forgotten — though you may need a pick-me- up afterward. Egyptian Theatre, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood; Sat., May 12, 7:30 p.m.; $15. (323) 466-3456, americancinemathequecalendar.com.
Abbas Kiarostami’s death in 2016 rattled the tec- tonic plates of international cinema. Now his final film, finished under the auspices of his son Ahmad, makes its Los Angeles debut at the Billy Wilder. 24 Frames is composed of two dozen vignettes — shot in black- and-white with a stationary camera — that pay tribute to cinema’s artistic ancestors, particularly painting and photography. As a final statement from one of the
THE HERMIT (EL ERMITAño) An Animated Short
25
next to a warm, female body. Boom makes Basquiat out to be an on-the-fringe, Zelig-like character, attempting to get
his foot into a scene where the inner-city people were beginning to mingle with the downtown folk. Driver’s film presents a Basquiat who was always trying to find ways to express himself. By the time he got to being a major, Warhol-approved Big Artist, he still wanted to pick the brains
of bohos like filmmaker Jim Jarmusch, looking for inspiration even when the art world turned him into an on-the-rise wun- derkind. In the end, Boom makes the case that the scene Basquiat came from was more fascinating than Basquiat himself. (Craig D. Lindsey)
GO THE GUARDIANS (LES GARDIENNES) The gutting French
WWI romantic drama The Guardians convincingly examines homebound women sublimating lovesick anxiet-
ies (sexual, parental and sororal) into farmyard chores after their sons and husbands were sent to the eastern front. Director Xavier Beauvois and director
of photography Caroline Champetier’s picturesque landscape shots of women plowing fields and raking coals suggest why resourceful farmhand Francine (Iris Bry) prefers to chop firewood than to pursue a relationship with recently con-
scripted soldier Georges (Cyril Descours). Francine, a nomadic outsider who lives wherever she can find work, prefers
the immediate satisfaction she gets
from physical labor. That’s because
she knows that everybody — including stubborn farm owner Hortense (Nathalie Baye), Francine’s boss and Georges’ mom — expects Georges to marry jealous frump Marguerite (Mathilde Viseux-Ely) instead, just because Marguerite’s a lo- cal girl. Beauvois (Of Gods and Men) and fellow co-writers Frederique Moreau and Marie-Julie Maille’s focus on the subtle beauty of everyday chores pays off hand- somely when Hortense’s cheery neighbor Monette (Maille) catches her breath sec- onds after a local messenger tells her — while she kneads bread dough with her daughter — that her husband has been killed in action. Months of unexamined emotions (regret, heartache and over- whelming uncertainty) cross Maille’s face as she — looking everywhere but at the bearer of bad news — stubbornly flicks gobs of batter off her fingers, as if trying to rid herself of her unruly feelings. These unassumingly powerful details make The Guardians one of the year’s most affect- ing love stories. (Simon Abrams)
LU OVER THE WALL (YOAKE TSUGERU LU NO UTA) Mermaids are the new
vampires, so Masaaki Yuasa’s bouncy anime Lu Over the Wall incorporates vampiric elements into its mermaid mythos, because why not? Indeed, “because why not?” seems to be the guiding impulse behind this colorful trifle about a teenager named Kai (the voice
of Michael Sinterniklaas), a talented musician who’s been sulking ever since his family moved from Tokyo to a small fishing village. He reluctantly agrees to help classmates Yuho (Stephanie Sheh) and Kunio (Brandon Engman) with their band, creating music that attracts a little mermaid named Lu (Christine Marie Cabanos). Calling the mermaid little isn’t just an easy Disney allusion; she’s a wee thing, which combined with her limited vocabulary, wide smile, and desire to spread love and friendship makes her come across like a precocious 5-year-old, or perhaps the Manic Pixie Dream Girl archetype taken to its logical conclusion. Her relationship with Kai remains largely platonic, though Lu’s own music makes humans dance uncontrollably, causing all hell to break loose in Kai’s historically mermaid-phobic village. Oh, and direct sunlight is fatal to Lu and her bite can turn humans and dogs into mer-crea- tures, so again, she’s a skosh vampiric. Even by anime standards, Lu Over the Wall
THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER
“BOMER is a talented actor
and here gives
The Neverending story
medium’s most humane and accomplished artists, it’s worth a look for its pedigree alone. UCLA’s Billy Wilder Theater, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Westwood; Sat.-Sun., May 12-13, 7 p.m.; $10. (310) 206-8013, cinema.ucla.edu.
Cinespia is back for the summer with its series of films screened on the grounds of Hollywood Forever Cemetery. First on the list is The NeverEnding Story, Wolfgang Peterson’s primal, oneiric yet kid-friendly fantasy that inspired two sequels we shall not discuss. The 1980s never really died, as the film’s continued popularity has proven in the decades since — even the skeptical adult might find it hard to pooh-pooh the film’s strong bid for child literacy (ditto The Princess Bride). Tickets sell out faster than Falkor the Luckdragon can fly, so don’t drag your feet. Hollywood Forever Cemetery, 6000 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood; Sat., May 12, 8:30 p.m.; $16 (plus $12 for on-site parking). cinespia.org.
Tuesday, May 15
If Saturday night’s triple dose of Bergman at the Egyp- tian leaves you wanting more, try a Wild Strawberries chaser at LACMA. The stormy auteur’s 1957 film is one of his finest, defined by a deep humanism surrounding the story of a professor coming face-to-face with his life’s failures en route to accepting a lifetime achieve- ment award. Starring legendary Swedish director- turned-actor Victor Sjöström, the film features a classic opening dream sequence that ranks with Hitchcock’s Spellbound and Buñuel’s Los olvidados as one of the best ever. LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Mid-Wilshire; Tue., May 15, 1 p.m.; $4. (323) 857-6000, lacma.org. —Nathaniel Bell
May 11 - 17, 2018 ❖ Fri, Sat, Sun, Mon, Wed & Thu: 12:55PM Tuesday 12:20PM
Laemmle’s Royal Theatre
11523 Santa Monica Blvd.❖ West L.A., CA 90025 310-478-3836 ❖ laemmle.com
RONAN STOLL MOSS
GLENN MICHAEL BILLY FLESHLER ZEGEN HOWLE
MARE WINNINGHAM
AND BRIAN DENNEHY
ANNETTE SAOIRSE COREY ELISABETH
BENING
JON TENNEY
TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL
“DELIVERS SENSUALITY IN SPADES.” -Frank Scheck, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER
John Carroll Lynch
and Maura Tierney
CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES NO PASSES ACCEPTED
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY, MAY 11
SANTA MONICA
“BOTH LAUGH OUT LOUD
HILARIOUS AND TRAGICALLY SAD.” -Brandon Katz, NEW YORK OBSERVER
THE SEAGULL
WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM
STARTS FRIDAY, MAY 11
STEPHEN KARAM
MICHAEL MAYER
SCREENPLAY BY
WEST LOS ANGELES
The Landmark at W. Pico & Westwood
(310) 470-0492 landmarktheatres.com
DIRECTED BY
VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.THESEAGULL-MOVIE.COM
LAWPEOEKIGLYNANT 2X3.5 THUR 5/10
“
A SENSITIVE, HEARTFELT PERFORMANCE.
LYNCH is TRULY
Matt Bomer
WONDERFUL!” LOS ANGELES BLADE
HOLLYWOOD
ArcLight Cinemas At Sunset & Vine
(323) 615-2550 arclightcinemas.com
AND WELL-TOLD LOVE STORY.”
Laemmle’s Monica Film Center (310) 478-3836 laemmle.com Tickets @ laemmle.com


































































































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