Page 31 - LA Weekly 110818
P. 31

SUN. NOVEMBER 11
BEN IS DEAD 30TH ANNIVERSARY REUNION
WED. NOVEMBER 7
G HERBO W/ SPECIAL GUESTS SOUTHSIDE + QUEEN KEY
FRI. NOVEMBER 9
MILO (LIVE)
FRI. NOVEMBER 9
MINTY BOI PRESENTS:
THUR. NOVEMBER 8
CLAUDIO SIMONETTI’S: GOBLIN
FRI. NOVEMBER 9
BIROCRATIC X MOODS
SAT. NOVEMBER 10
RESPECT + KILLAHURTZ PRESENT: DC BREAKS, MAKOTO, & FLITE
CROWD LU
COMING SOON:
11/10 - BLUEFACE
11/10 - THE HABESHA REUNION LA 11/11 - SENSORY SESSIONS
11/14 - TYUS W/ ESO.XO.SUPREME
11/15 - WHITE RABBIT GROUP: FILTHY 11/16 - OLIVER FRANCIS
11/16 - OSHUN FT. PRODDA
11/16 - DAS BUNKER: ORPHX & ADAM X
CATCH.ONE
4067 W. PICO BLVD., LOS ANGELES, 90019 • 323.737.1159
was twinkling, revelatory and cataclysmic.
—DaviD Cotner
Radio Free Hollywood Reunion
@ BOOTLEG THEATER
It’s hard to imagine now but in 1976 night- clubs like the Whisky and the Starwood wouldn’t book unsigned bands performing original music. The entire L.A. club scene was a strictly regulated musical wasteland
of cover bands and washed-up metal acts until three local groups — hard-rocking proto-punks The Dogs, aptly named pow- er-pop hopefuls The Pop and Martha Davis’ then-unknown The Motels — invoked the spirit of Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney by putting on their own show in a rented Hollywood hall. That gathering did so well that the established clubs slowly began to book power-pop and even punk bands. Tonight’s reunion includes ongoing groups from the era, such as The Dogs and The Last, alongside rare flashbacks from Carla Olson’s reconfigured Textones, Backstage Pass, The Furys, Gregg Sutton, Andy & the Rattle- snakes, The Hollywood Stars, The Model, and former members of The Pop, The Mo- tels and The Brats. —Falling James
Sisterook
proof. —Brett CallwooD tue 11/13
Gary Clark Jr.
@ THE FONDA THEATRE
By now, it should be clear that Gary Clark
Jr. is more than just a bluesman. The native
of Austin, Texas, can play circles around most other modern blues guitarists. Unlike so many technicians, though, Clark doesn’t only dazzle with speed or resort to reverential mimicry; instead, the notes pour out of his ax with a loud, dirty, palpable ferocity that punches you in the gut with a physical pres- ence. He’s jammed and/or recorded with The Rolling Stones, ZZ Ward, Childish Gambino, Alicia Keys, Tech N9ne and even the gently innocuous Dave Matthews Band, but Clark is no sleepy revivalist. His own music on such recordings as The Story of Sonny Boy Slim and his upcoming new album is fused with hard rock and hip-hop and delivered with
a controlled raw power that’s heavier than grunge without devolving into cheesy metal. Also Monday, Nov. 12; Wednesday, Nov. 14; and Thursday, Nov. 15. —Falling James
wed 11/14
Sparks
@ PALACE THEATRE
Few bands in the history of bands have been as intriguing over such a grand length of time as Sparks. Brothers Ron and Rus-
sell Mael have consistently confounded expectations by blending glam rock with symphonic sounds, new wave with classical, lowbrow with high art. 1974’s Kimono My House and the accompanying single, “This Town Ain’t Big Enough for the Both of Us,” are absolutely classic, and remain the group’s best-known work. But like Bowie and Lou Reed, everything they’ve put their name
on is worth checking out, right up to last year’s Hippopotamus. Even the FFS (Franz Ferdinand and Sparks) project in 2015 was semi-interesting. These gigs at the Palace will be well worth catching. Also Thursday, Nov. 15. —Brett CallwooD
thu 11/15
Meat Beat Manifesto
@ 1720
Swindon, England, is most famous for having given the world XTC and Meat Beat Manifesto (although Justin Hayward of Birmingham band The Moody Blues is from there, too). But that’s not a bad return from the modest town located between Reading and Bristol in the south of Britain. MBM ended up being one of the most influential electronic industrial groups, having a big impact on Chicago label Wax Trax! and, in turn, influencing the likes of Nine Inch Nails and The Prodigy. The duo, Jack Dangers
and Jonny Stephens, released their 11th studio album, Impossible Star, in January
of this year, and one would imagine that we’ll get a typically fierce, uncompromising, career-spanning set at 1720. Whiteqube and Sleep Clinic also play. —Brett CallwooD
31
@ THE STUDY HOLLYWOOD
Ventura County is a good place to hide a great band, since the scene up north largely centers on cover acts instead of groups making bold, aggressive underground music. The furiously hard-rocking Ojai quartet Sisterook probably would stand out as distinctive in almost any other music scene, which makes this relatively rare
visit to Hollywood a prime opportunity to catch up with one of SoCal’s most under- rated bands. Led by witchy, charismatic singer-guitarist Evangeline Noelle and powered further by the booming bottom end of her bassist-husband, Yam, Sisterook lay down monstrously heavy riffs that fall somewhere between punk, psychedelia and grunge. Soaring above it all are Noelle’s searing vocals, which she belts out with a bluesy, divalike assurance amid a hailstorm of distorted guitar sparks on such convul- sive opuses as “Take Your Knife Out of My Back.” —Falling James
mon 11/12
Elle King
@ BELASCO THEATER
History says that Elle King should have been forgotten by now. Her Love Stuff album and “Ex’s & Oh’s” single earned Rob Schneider’s daughter a bunch of attention, and deservedly so. That single remains
a bona fide banger — pop country with
a rockabilly swing, without any of the fashionable sheen of overproduction. But a glance over our collective shoulders tells us that, usually, that would be the end and King would be destined for the “one-hit wonder” files. But here’s the thing — King isn’t just another Hollywood wannabe trading on her parent’s fame. What we have here is a real talent. An honest and raw artist. And the sophomore Shake the Spirit album, which landed this month, is
LA WEEKLY | November 9 - 15, 2018 | WWW.LAWEEKLY.com


































































































   29   30   31   32   33