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status quo to change. Sponsored by United Way of Greater Los Angeles and the Watt Companies, the Shark Tank (but with bet- ter ideas!)–style event will award $200,000 to the best service solution for tackling homelessness. The finalists include Venice Family Clinic’s proposal to expand and educate the public on street medicine; a program that offers families mobile child- care; and various housing and support regimes. The evening opens with hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. InterContinental Hotel Los Angeles, 900 Wilshire Blvd., downtown; Wed., Nov. 14, 5:30-8:30 p.m.; free, RSVP required. eventbrite.com/e/ la-homelessness-challenge-pitch-event- tickets-50787065480. —Avery Bissett
thu 11/15 Art
The Body Politic
En Cuatro Patas is the Broad’s feminist Latinx performance series, in which an eclectic range of possible identities across the community and positions as citizens of the world have been explored, mani- festing as interdisciplinary avant-garde quasi-theatrical experiences. This edition features Given Over to Want by interna- tionally acclaimed multimedia artist Nao Bustamante; Shadow Woman by Gina Osterloh, a visual artist who has always
enacted performative elements as part of her installations and compositions; and INFESTACIÓN: PISOS I, II, III by the op- eratically soulful composer-singer-activist Dorian Wood. The Broad, 221 S. Grand Ave., downtown; Thu., Nov. 15, 8:30 p.m.; $15. (213) 232-6200, thebroad.org. —shAnA nys DAmBrot
BooKs
Wrongly Convicted
Damien Echols was one of the West Mem- phis Three, a trio of teenagers who were convicted in 1994 of murdering three young boys in Arkansas in 1993. The case attracted a lot of media attention, with many follow- ers, including Pearl Jam’s Eddie Vedder, decrying the judicial process, and the West Memphis Three eventually were freed from prison, if not fully exonerated. Echols and his friends appeared to have been convicted based more on their lifestyle as fans of heavy metal than on hard evidence that defini- tively proved their guilt. “Magick saved my life,” Echols writes in his new book, High Magick. “Magick was the only thing in prison that gave my life purpose and kept me sane.” He discusses the book with The Dixie Chicks’ Natalie Maines. The Regent Theater, 448 S. Main St., downtown; Thu., Nov. 15, 8 p.m.; $32. (323) 934-2944, ticket fly.com/event/1769072-damien-echols-in- conversation-los-angeles/. —FAlling JAmes
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Nov 10th Sat 11am - 7pm 11th Sun 11am - 5pm
1300 Glendale Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026
2 col 1/4 4.494” x 5.2292”
LA WEEKLY | November 9 - 15, 2018 | WWW.LAWEEKLY.com


































































































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