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LA WEEKLY | November 23 - 29, 2018 | WWW.LAWEEKLY.COM
in front of it. It was a lot of fun,” Ray said. Ray took pride in how fully his team and partners got on board with this mission, which he has worked
for years to embed in Bloomʼs corporate culture. He brought the entire company together to help promote this mission. “This wasnʼt just some kind of marketing team initiative,” he said. It went from the production department to the legal team and even the accountants.
“Everybody did whatever it was that they could do,” Ray said. “For a lot of them it was small things like volunteer day at one of the participating food banks, or just changing their email signature to bring awareness to World Food Day.”
And it wasnʼt just his staff. “We had Eaze volunteering at the food bank with us, we had brick-and-mortar dispensaries partners volunteering with us at the food bank. It was a big success in my eyes.”
As we enter the official season of giving, Ray noted the cannabis industryʼs penchant to give back all the time, as opposed to when itʼs at the front of peopleʼs mind during the holidays.
“For us, our season of giving and participating in our social good program is year-round, not necessarily something special for the holidays. We just continue to promote our one-to-one program. Itʼs a never-ending initiative,” he said.
Ray noted, thankfully, that around the holiday season
food banks get a lot of support from the community. “Thatʼs the time the general population really wants
to give back as well. So they get very busy with volun- teers workers and help, which is fantastic. In November and December, theyʼre pushing out a lot of meals to people who need it.”
But for Ray, the problem really doesnʼt change a whole lot no matter what month is on the calendar.
Here in L.A., Bloom Farms has spent the last three years working with World Harvest Food Bank and founder Glenn Curado. Curado started the food bank in 2007 after seeing the process from a volunteer perspective at other food banks and believing it could be improved.
“Heʼs a total sweetheart and one of the nicest people Iʼve ever met,” Ray said of Curado. “Heʼs dedicated his whole life to this. Weʼre proud to be working with them.”
The praise was mutual from Curadoʼs end as he explained how it all came together.
“They gave me a call and said, ʻHey, weʼre a one-for- one companyʼ and asked if we wanted to be a part of it. I said yeah. Then he said, ʻDo you have any problems with marijuana and cannabis?ʼ I said no,” Curado said. Curado told Ray he was raised in Hawaii, “so it was all over the place,” he said with a chuckle. While Curado doesnʼt personally indulge in cannabis, he thought the whole thing sounded pretty awesome. “And they have
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Bloom Farms 1 for 1 program.
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COURTESY BLOOM FARMS


































































































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