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THUR. NOVEMBER 22
RIH RIH
FRI. NOVEMBER 23
BAILALO BASSMENT FRI. NOVEMBER 23
PEPPASEED
SAT. NOVEMBER 24
AFROLITUATION
COMING SOON:
11/27 THE MOTH: FEAR
11/28 SALSA FUEGO
11/29 SEAN HEALY PRESENTS:
JAKE & PAPA LIVE
11/29 THAT’S WHAT I CALL KARAOKE:
90’S KARAOKE
11/30 CLUB 90’S
11/30 TOP SHELF ONLY
11/30 SLIZZED ON SUNSET BLVD
12/5 MARIJUANA MADNESS BURLESQUE
12/7 CLUB 90’S
12/8 LAPALUX
FRI. NOVEMBER 23
CLUB 90’S
FRI. NOVEMBER 23
LOVE PARADE
SAT. NOVEMBER 24
LATIN BASHMENT PRESENTS: SWEET SATURDAYS
SUN. NOVEMBER 25
ACKAE BEKA + SPIRITUAL
12/9
12/10 12/14 12/14 12/14
12/21 12/25
12/28 12/31 1/4 1/17
COAST 2 COAST LIVE
LA EDITION
THE FLOOR IMPROV NIGHT: DJ UNIEQ YK OSIRIS
CLUB 90’S
TRYBVL - AFRO HOUSE + GQOM, BLAQ PAGES
CLUB 90’S
CHRISTMAS DAY DINNER
& TOY GIVEAWAY
CLUB 90’S
CLUB 90’S
CLUB 90’S
SEAN HEALY PRESENTS CHUUWEE & TRIZZ LIVE!
30
sun 11/25
The Fruit Flies
@ THE LOVE SONG
On their Facebook page, The Fruit Flies’ Danni Parpan and Molly McCormick describe their music as “one part mu-
sical talent, one part sassy charm and
two parts inappropriate behavior.” Such breezy indie-pop ditties as “Summer in
the City” demonstrate the first two parts of that equation with unabashedly joyful melodies that are characterized by the local duo’s cheery harmonies and simple acoustic-guitar backing. It’s not clear when the inappropriate behavior starts to occur, but Parpan and McCormick have the range to segue into more solemnly moving and glassily beautiful soundscapes such as “06 Lullaby” alongside sunnier, folk-style reveries like “Golden,” which are graced by the pair’s lilting harmonies. This evening’s free set at the Love Song offers a prime opportunity to fall for The Fruit Flies’ deceptively simple musical spells. —Falling James
mon 11/26
Cornelia Murr
@ BOOTLEG THEATER
Cornelia Murr was born in London and lives in California but she’s lived all around the United States, and her latest album, Lake Tear of the Clouds, was inspired by her time in New York’s Hudson Valley. Pro- duced by My Morning Jacket’s Jim James, the new record is an aural travelogue through various mellow states of mind, ranging from the dreamy ethereality of “Billions” to the organ-steeped breathiness of “Cicada.” The album even includes a ver- sion of Yoko Ono’s “I Have a Woman Inside My Soul,” which Murr has transformed into a moving R&B ballad that’s distin- guished by her soulfully soothing vocal de- livery. The recording features such guests as vocalist Lola Kirke and My Morning Jacket keyboardist Bo Koster, but ultimately it’s
a showcase for Murr’s uniquely restrained and low-key ruminations. This show is part of a Motor Sales residency; Mike Viola also plays. —Falling James
tue 11/27
Richard Lloyd
@ BOOTLEG THEATER
Best known as a founding member of pioneering New York CBGB’s house band Television, Richard Lloyd recently also has been a member of re-formed Cleveland punks (and Dead Boys/Pere Ubu precur- sors) Rocket From the Tombs. He’s been
a solo artist of note, though, since 1979’s Alchemy, which arrived shortly after the initial breakup of Television. His most recent solo album, and his seventh in total, is 2016’s Rosedale — a wonderfully in- sightful, poignant and honest record at this stage in his storied career. Live, he tends to veer toward career-spanning sets, so expect a bit of everything. His own renditions of Television tunes can be fascinating, to say
the least. But, whatever, he’s an underrated guitarist and any opportunity to see him is well worth grasping. —Brett Callwood
wed 11/28
Brockhampton
@ SHRINE ExpO HALL
Brockhampton are the rap version of your favorite boy band. Coming up as a collective led by Texas native Kevin Abstract, the hip- hop group relocated to Los Angeles and suc- cessfully broke from the underground into the mainstream light. In the group, which
is approximately 14 deep, each member brings their own style and flare to the table, whether it’s rapping, singing, entertaining ... you name it. With the release of their de- but studio album, Saturation, in summer of 2017, fans flocked to their signature sound — which cannot be boxed into any type of genre — and hard-hitting production. Fol- lowing a deal with RCA Records earlier this year, the group dropped their fourth studio album, Iridescence, which peaked at No.
1 on the Billboard 200 Album Chart. Also Thursday, Nov. 29. —shirley Ju
thu 11/29
Georgia Anne Muldrow
@ LODGE ROOM
Georgia Anne Muldrow has been all over town lately. She was a spotlighted guest dur- ing L.A. Philharmonic’s CicLAvia spectacle back in September, and more recently she was one of several featured vocalists when the orchestra presented a rare performance of John Cage’s Apartment House 1776 at Disney Hall. But the local singer is best rep- resented by her own music on such albums as 2018’s Overload, in which she roams am- bitiously through soulful balladry and funky R&B interludes. Many of her original songs are intercut with hip-hop embellishments, and there are hints of jazz and psychede-
lia in Muldrow’s wide-ranging approach. Overload also includes contributions from Shana Jenson and Dudley Perkins, but it’s Muldrow’s restless, ever-changing per- sonality that remains at the center of it all. —Falling James
Elvis Costello
@ THE WILTERN
Much like a David Bowie or even a Bob Dylan, how much you enjoy Elvis Costello in 2018 depends on how prepared you have been to evolve with the artist. This isn’t the same quirky, bespectacled new-waver who charmed the world with punk-ish anthems such as “Oliver’s Army,” and “Pump It
Up.” Today’s Costello is far more subtle a singer-songwriter. A storyteller. The Look Now album, released last month, is glorious proof. It’s also his first studio album in five years, and finds him writing with the very un-punk likes of Carole King and Burt Bacharach. Hey, one could argue that his determination to do exactly what he wants is the very definition of punk. Whatever
— the new album is a banger, and he’ll inevitably be wonderful at the Wiltern. —Brett Callwood
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